Organic compounds are used in Lucknow Imambara.

Organic compounds are used in Lucknow Imambara.

The Lucknow Imambada, also known as the Asfi Imambada, is a Shia Muslim mourning hall in Lucknow, India. It was built in 1837 by Nawab Asaf-ud-Daula, the then ruler of Awadh. The monument was built with organic compounds like Urad dealr,ice husks and jaggery.

The Imambara is open to all regardless of religion or caste, and no entry fee is free.

Organic compounds pwere used in building Imambara without modern tools?

It is incredible to think about how the ancient architects built such imposing structures without any of the modern tools and technology we take for granted today. Impressing enough many of these buildings were constructed from organic materials, which have long since crumbled and decayed. 

So how did they do it? 

Researchers have put forth several theories based on archaeological evidence and their understanding of the physics of construction. One popular theory suggests that workers used levers and pulleys to move massive stone blocks into place. 

File:Bara Imambara Lucknow.jpg - Wikipedia

A mixture of lime and urad dal forms the walls of the Imambara.

The walls of the imambara are from a mixture of urad dal and limestone. It is incredible to think about how the architects built such imposing structures without any of the modern tools and technology we take for granted today. 

Even more impressive is that many of these buildings were constructed from organic materials, which have long since crumbled and decayed. 

The roof are of rice husks.

The Imambara is a magnificent architecture and sprawling size. But what many people don’t know about the roof of this imposing structure of entirely out of rice husk! 

When construction first began on the Imambara, there was a shortage of timber in Lucknow. As a result, Asaf-ud-Daula got creative with the materials available to him. He devised the idea of using rice husk to create a lightweight but sturdy roof for his Imambara. And it worked! The roof has been standing strong for over 200 years now, testimony to the resourcefulness of its creator. 

Today, visitors see the Lucknow Imambara and its unique rice husk roof. It’s a fascinating example of how necessity can lead to innovation, even in architecture!

Bara Imambara - Lucknow (Uttar Pradesh) Timings, Images, History

Tree gum and jaggery were alternatives of cement to fix the bricks.

Did you know that tree gum and jaggery instead of cement to fix the bricks together? This is just one of the many fascinating facts about this royal structure. 

It is a fantastic example of engineering and construction skills. Impressive about these buildings are construction from organic materials, which have long since crumbled and decayed. 

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